Sustainable Human and Environmental Systems Roundtable

The Sustainable Human and Environmental Systems (SHES) Roundtable (originally the Environmental Systems and Sustainability Roundtable, followed by the Environment and Sustainability Roundtable) was formed in June of 2008 by members of the IEA and several other environmental progrRevised Logo transams and organizations for the purpose of moving forward the assorted academic and administrative discussions on interdisciplinary environmental education that have been held at IICE conferences and other venues over the years. The focus of the SHES Roundtable involves issues of field identity, name, core competencies, pedagogical approaches, program structure, and recognition for interdisciplinary and higher-order environmental programs in the United States (with the potential for an international effort in the future). Discussions by academics, program directors, administrators, environmental agency personnel, and practitioners have led to consensus on a number of important topics that have become the basis for proposals arising from the Roundtable.

The SHES Roundtable is an ongoing effort producing a living set of recommendations concerning the pedagogical and administrative aspects of interdisciplinary environmental education. Roundtable participants have agreed that both specialist and more holistic approaches are needed to address environmental issues, and that interdisciplinary environmental education seeks to provide the latter. Discussions of terminology in the environmental education domain led to consensus that the interface between human systems and the environment is the focus of the field with a holistic endpoint being desired, though more reductionist approaches can be part of an ultimately holistic program. From the perspective of the Roundtable, the ultimate SHES goal is to promote the emergence of societies that facilitate, enhance, and sustain indefinitely both stewardship of the environment and the wellbeing of human individuals and communities. The instrumental SHES goal is then to engage in the holistic, adaptive management of human and environmental systems and interactions in support of the ultimate goal. Pedagogically, the SHES goal is to facilitate holistic, supradisciplinary learning that reveals the complexity of the interactions among human and environmental systems that shape the viability of those systems in support of the instrumental field goal. It is thus the goal of institutions desiring to support SHES programs to develop courses, programs, and administrative structures that support this pedagogical goal. These goals recognize and elucidate the extent to which the interactions among human systems and environmental systems shape the fate of both. It also implies that neither stewardship of the environment nor the well-being of human individuals or communities can be achieved without an approach to managing the interactions among those systems that is both holistic and adaptive.

The Roundtable proposes that this academic domain be given the name Sustainable Human and Environmental Systems, identified as a supradisciplinary field. Interdisciplinary and supradisciplinary program designs are part of this domain, with pluridisciplinary approaches being a transition phase from lower levels of integration (unidisciplinary, transdisciplinary) to where the field seeks to be. The Roundtable also reached provisional consensus on a set of 8 skills, 13 perspectives on interactions, and 12 synthetic applications that should be considered core competencies for ESS programs and their students, with these competencies capable of being learned within a wide range of contexts as appropriate to a program’s faculty, location, and interests. As of the 10th Roundtable, this concept and the associated tables are in the process of being revised, updated, and expanded.

The Roundtable offers these proposals as a starting point for discussion, to be developed, demonstrated, and finalized in more inclusive Roundtables and projects in the near future. Those interested in the existing proposals are referred to the following publications:

Barresi, P. A., W. J. Focht, M. A. Reiter, R. C. Smardon, M. L. Humphreys, K. D. Reiter, and S. A. Kolmes. 2015.  Revealing complexity in educating for sustainability: An update on the work of the roundtable on environment and sustainability. In W. Leal Filho, L. Brandli, O. Kuznetsova, A. Paço (eds). Integrative Approaches to Sustainable Development at University Level: Making the Links. World Sustainability Series (from WSSD-U-2014), January. Springer, Berlin, 731 pp. ISBN  9783319106892.

Reiter, M. A., Focht, W. J., Barresi, P. A., Gill, S., Smardon, R. C., Baker, S. L., Reiter, K. D., Fitch, E., Rolfe, T., and Bumpous, S. (2012). Making Education for Sustainability Work on Campus: The Proposals of the Roundtable on Environmental Systems and Sustainability. In W. Leal Filho (Ed.), Umweltbildung, Umweltkommunikation und Nachhaltigkeit [Environmental Education, Communication and Sustainability]: Vol. 34, Ch. 8 of the series Sustainable Development at Universities: New Horizons (pp. 109-116). Frankfurt am Main, Germany: Peter Lang Scientific.

Reiter, M. A., W. J. Focht, P. A. Barresi, S. Bumpous, R. C. Smardon, and K. D. Reiter. 2011. Making Education for Sustainability Work on Your Campus: The Roundtables on Environmental Systems and Sustainability. In: Leal Filho, W. (ed.) “World Trends in Education for Sustainable Development”, Vol. 32, Ch. 4. of the series “Umweltbildung, Umweltkommunikation und Nachhaltigkeit” (Environmental Education, Communication and Sustainability), pp 61-76. Peter Lang Scientific Publishers, Frankfurt, Germany. ISBN 9783631619568.

The SHES Roundtable will be presenting a paper on more recent developments regarding revealing complexity in educating for sustainability at several upcoming conferences plus a book under development, and is continuing its work with the refinement of some past proposals. Those interested in joining the Roundtable and participating in its work, or those interested in the most recent proposals of the Roundtable, are encouraged to contact one of the Co-Chairs, Dr. Michael Reiter of Bethune-Cookman University,  Dr. Will Focht of Oklahoma State University, or Dr. Paul Barresi of Southern New Hampshire University.

rev. 9/14/15